by

December 19, 2013

Do you like this?

Our gal on the bar stool tells us all about Patron

ALL I WANT FOR CHRISTMAS is a golden tan, a tall dark man with a big boat, and a margarita in my hand. 

Yes, I may not get my tan back for a while, and I happily traded my tall, dark and handsome for a tall, handsome blond and two wild children  a long time ago—but at least  Santa knows he can always bring me a margarita...on the rocks with salt and extra lime. 

As we embark on the holidays, we often think of eggnog and hotty tottys…something to keep us warm and snuggled through our three-snowflakes-a-year Chattanooga winter...but we can’t forget about our dear friend Patron.  After working in a brewery for five years and being in or around bars for more time than my personality wants to admit, I like to think of myself as well versed in the spirits of our craft. 

This is especially true when it comes to beer.  I delight in shunning those next to me who order anything ending in light and as a woman I revel in the knowledge of hops and barley while seeking out a more unique selection. But my pompous snobbery ends very quickly once you step out of the ales and lagers. 

It has been a silent mission this year to become more knowledgeable about spirits. I have stabilized my personal vodka drink, learned about the process of whiskey, and  realized that people drink tequila because they enjoy it, not to mention discovering that there are more mixers then sour and orange juice to pair with it.  

A wise man once said, “One tequila, two tequila, three tequila, FLOOR.” Well, OK, I can’t argue with that. So in celebration of the floor, family, friends, and having a day off, let me share some info about tequila that will make you seem expert while you pour salt on your hand or plug in your favorite uncle’s margarita machine for the holidays.  

“Tequila for dummies” informs us that this denomination of alcohol is derived  from the blue agave plant and originates from the city of Tequila, which is northwest of Guadalajara in the Mexican state of Jalisco. (thanks, wiki). As with most spirits, the location and soil used for the plant determines the outcome of taste, in this case, either a sweeter or more herbaceous feel. 

Tequila has been around since the 16th century and can only be produced in Mexico. The process is still very involved in its roots of manual labor despite the newer technology that is available. In the Patron family, you often see three of the five types of tequila behind your favorite bar or package store. 

Patron Silver in the blanco family is unaged. Silver is immediately bottled and put on the shelves. Stored in stainless steel or neutral oak barrels, Silver will not sit more than two months.  Patron Reposado is contained in oak barrels and can be aged anywhere from two months to two years, and your Patron Anejo is aged up to but not more than three years and is contained in small oak barrels. The science of spirits still amazes me.   

Luckily, Christmas falls on a weekday this year which ensures your ability to get those last-minute gifts and party favors. Nothing says you are important and I love you more than a bottle of tequila. Paired with some local flair, drinks such as Navidad Nectar, Smoking Apple, and my personal favorite, Getting Figgy With It, can be just the surprise you need to impress your holiday guests. 

Patron has an excellent website with recipes such as these and many, many more. The margarita is a classic—but who knew you could go so much further. For those who want to break so-called tradition and skip the messy kitchen and neurotic household prep, I suggest you go see one of our friends at either location of El Meson. You can try all of these Patron products and indulge in their amazing Sunday buffet, diverse menu and $6 Patron  margaritas.

Happy Holidays to you from all the family here at the Pulse—and remember never drink and drive. I promise someone will get a picture of you at the Christmas party acting a fool—not to mention Santa is watching! 

by

December 19, 2013

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